The RISK Project has published more than 40 studies on how Hurricane Katrina has shaped our participants’ well-being. These analyses have provided critical insights into physical and mental health outcomes, residential mobility, social support, child well-being, education and economic outcomes, posttraumatic growth, and more. Select publications have been featured in the American Journal of Public Health, Health Affairs, Health Psychology, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Findings have enabled the RISK Project team to identify a broad range of factors that influence post-disaster well-being over the course of time.

Mental Health Outcomes

Lowe SR, et al. (2020). Journal of Traumatic Stress.

A Life‐Course Model of Trauma Exposure and Mental Health Among Low‐Income Survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

Lowe SR, et al. (2020). PLOS One.

Predisaster predictors of posttraumatic stress symptom trajectories: An analysis of low-income women in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Raker EJ, et al. (2020). Health Affairs.

Mitigating health disparities after natural disasters: Lessons From The RISK Project.

Raker EJ, et al. (2020). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Lessons from Hurricane Katrina for predicting the indirect health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Manove, E., et al. (2019). American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.

Posttraumatic growth in low-income Black mothers who survived Hurricane Katrina. 

Raker, E.J., et al. (2019). Social Science & Medicine.

Twelve years later: The long-term mental health consequences of Hurricane Katrina.

Arcaya, M.C., et al. (2017). Health Psychology.

Lowe, S. R., et al. (2015). Current Psychology.

Understanding resilience and other trajectories of psychological distress: A mixed-methods study of low-income mothers who survived Hurricane Katrina.

Arcaya, M. C., et al. (2014). Journal of Traumatic Stress.

Association of PTSD symptoms with asthma attacks among Hurricane Katrina survivors.

Calvo, R., et al. (2014). Journal of Happiness Studies.

Happily ever after? Pre and post disaster determinants of happiness among survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

Dunn, E. C., et al. (2014). Journal of Affective Disorders.

Interaction between genetic variants and exposure to Hurricane Katrina on post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth: A prospective analysis of low income adults 

Fussell, E. & Lowe, S. R. (2014). Social Science and Medicine.

The impact of housing displacement on the mental health of low-income parents after Hurricane Katrina.

Lowe, S. R. & Rhodes, J. E. (2013). American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.

 Trajectories of psychological distress among low-income, female survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

Paxson, C., et al. (2012). Social Science & Medicine.

Five years later: Recovery from post traumatic stress and psychological distress among low-income mothers affected by Hurricane Katrina.

Chan, C. S., et al. (2011). American Journal of Community Psychology.

A prospective study of religiousness and psychological distress among female survivors of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Lowe, S. R., et al. (2011). Journal of Family Issues.

The impact of child-related stressors on the psychological functioning of lower-income mothers after Hurricane Katrina.

Rhodes, J., et al. (2010). American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.

The impact of Hurricane Katrina on the mental and physical health of low-income parents in New Orleans 

Zwiebach, L., et al. (2010). Journal of Traumatic Stress.

Resource loss, resource gain, and mental health among survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

Lowe, S. R., et al. (2009). Journal of Traumatic Stress.

The impact of pet loss on perceived social support and psychological distress among Hurricane Katrina survivors.

Education and Economic Outcomes

Deterding, N. (2015). Sociology of Education.

Instrumental and expressive education: College planning in the face of poverty.

Lowe, S. R. & Rhodes, J. E. (2012). Journal of College Student Retention.

Community college re-enrollment after Hurricane Katrina.